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hairylarry
Tonight on Inspired Unreality we are talking about books and stories. The opening topic will be The Origins Of Fantasy. Fantasy is the well spring that D&D grew out of. Do fantasy stories predate civilization? Or is there an era in literature when fantasy was born?

Inspired Unreality is held every Monday night in the gamerplus chatrooms at Tenkar's Tavern on Discord. For more info go here.

https://gamerplus.org/index

Last week Ari and Caper worked on Caper's Song Book. And we started on a list of songs for the book. Then we wrote this.

Song of perception

tin tin aree tin tin aroo
look about look about could be you
jump about jump about one and two
tin tin aree tin tin aroo

To be sung by the whole party twice through to increases alertness and perception.

Here's a link to my post about Caper's Song Book.

https://gamerplus.org/blogs/post/798

Carl Heyl linked to the Conan Artbook Kickstarter from the Troll Lords!

https://gamerplus.org/newsfeed/4186

I added a chapter to my book in progress, Setting Up A Twitch Studio - Using Tech Creatively. The new chapter is about Web Promotion.

https://gamerplus.org/blogs/post/801

What have you been reading? Join us tonight on Inspired Unreality and let us know. What have you been writing? Post a link. Do you use tech creatively? Comment on my post.

Please share this newsletter with your gaming friends.

Thanks,
Hairy Larry
https://gamerplus.org/user/hairylarry
hairylarry@curators.mixremix.cc
hairylarry@deltaboogie.com
hairylarry

A bard's songbook is like a magician's spell book in that it contains words of power, songs for wind, songs for rain, songs to make the fire burn hotter and warm the room, songs of companionship to warm the heart.


https://gamerplus.org/blogs/post/797


Ari and Caper worked on Caper's Song Book last night on Inspired Unreality.


First we worked on a list of songs.


Song to make people dance
Song to make people alert
Song to make people like me AKA the opening numbers
Song of reflection

Song of hope


We renamed Song to make people alert to


Song of perception
tin tin aree tin tin aroo
look about look about could be you
jump about jump about one and two
tin tin aree tin tin aroo


and we wrote the lyric.


To be sung by the whole party twice through to increases alertness and perception.


The bard leads the song. The party sings it twice around. Just that helps. Some DMs may give pluses or advantage on perception and other pertinent rolls.


We had a great time and I look forward to filling in more blank pages in Caper's Song Book in the future.


Next week, Monday, August 2, is the first Monday of the month and we will be discussing Fantasy and Science Fiction literature.

hairylarry Jul 27 · Comments: 1 · Tags: bards, d&d, osr, rpg, songs
hairylarry
A bard's songbook is like a magician's spell book in that it contains words of power, songs for wind, songs for rain, songs to make the fire burn hotter and warm the room, songs of companionship to warm the heart.

I'm reading "The Broken Sword" by Poul Anderson. As they set sail to the frozen north he writes this.

"Let us away," said Mananaan. He and Skafloc stepped into the boat from the small dock and raised the glowing sail. The man took the steering oar while the godling struck a chord on his harp and sang:

  Wind I call you, old, unresting,
  from the deeps of sea and sky.
  Blow me outward on my questing,
  answer me with eager cry.
  From the hills of home behind you,
  out through shifting leagues of sea,
  blow wind blow! My song shall bind you.
  South wind, sea wind, come to me.
  Come to set my vessel free.

At his music, a strong breeze sprang up and the boat surged forth into waves of cold and green that threw salt spray onto their lips.

 - Poul Anderson, from "The Broken Sword"

I'm working on a song book for Caper. A song for wind, a song for rain, a song of warmth, a song of companionship, a song to give you courage.

If you have suggestions for Caper's book please leave them in the comments. Or if you have favorite bardsongs from fantasy literature or gaming point the way.


https://gamerplus.org/blogs/post/796


Or join us tonight at Inspired Unreality as Ari and Caper work on Caper's song book. Inspired Unreality open game chat is held every Monday night in the Gamer+ chatrooms at Tenkar's Tavern on Discord. More info here.

https://gamerplus.org/index

Monday week will be August 2, the first Monday in August so we will be talking about fantasy and science fiction stories. If you enjoy great fantasy literature like "The Broken Sword" please join us. And join us tonight to help Caper fill his song book.

I was talking to Carl about the witch's chicken scratch that we are inventing to fill Ari's teas and potions book that Tude found and he come up with the perfect name. Wikkenscratch. As in, "He held the book sideways and upside down but it didn't help. Scratching his head he complained, 'I can't read this wikkenscratch'."

And Megan helped me come up with a subtitle for my new book. "Setting Up A Twitch Studio - Using Tech Creatively". The subtitle hints that the book is actually more than a twitch how to. In fact, the book will apply to almost any creative endeavor where technology is part of the picture.

Robert S. Conley posted a blog, "The one I write about the popularity of RPGs and the explosive growth of digital sales. Using numbers from DriveThruRPG."

https://gamerplus.org/newsfeed/4176

So do you have a new blog post, vlog, or podcast about gaming? Let me know.

Thanks,
Hairy Larry
https://gamerplus.org/user/hairylarry
hairylarry@curators.mixremix.cc
hairylarry@deltaboogie.com

hairylarry
Join us tonight at the Inspired Unreality Open Game Chat where we will discuss Science Fiction and Fantasy literature. Soon to be a monthly feature at Inspired Unreality.

We've already got some discussion going in my announcement thread.

https://gamerplus.org/newsfeed/4145


We don't mind controversy over at Gamer+. As long as it's controversy about gaming. Everybody's got their own old school. Mine didn't start until the early nineties. Most old schools are older than mine.

https://gamerplus.org/blogs/post/782

I added another post to my Setting Up A Twitch Studio series. Documentation. I try to teach by example. So, if you like to read documentation.

https://gamerplus.org/blogs/785

This series of articles has turned out to be broader in focus than I thought they would be and the ideas discussed pertain to any technical creative endeavor. I need to take a big top down view and decide where I'm going with this.

And here are our twitch streams.

https://www.twitch.tv/megantopia

https://www.twitch.tv/hairylarryland

Send me your links or post them to Gamer+.

Thanks,
Hairy Larry
https://gamerplus.org/user/hairylarry
hairylarry@curators.mixremix.cc
hairylarry@deltaboogie.com
hairylarry
Tonight! On Inspired Unreality. We will be chatting about games, or playing games, or maybe chatting about books, science fiction and fantasy literature. What we've read and what we like. Books. Games. Chat.

Inspired Unreality is held every Monday night at 9:00 Central in the gamerplus chatrooms at Tenkar's Tavern on Discord. If you've never been there's an invite here.

https://gamerplus.org/index

ZDL posted Deep Dive: OSR Critique about her actual experience in the OSR world when it was just called D&D.

"To establish my credentials, I have been playing RPGs of all kinds since 1977.  My first exposure to the genre was the 1977 "Blue Book" edition and I have backfilled experience with the original books, not to mention gone forward into both branches of D&D (Advanced and what would later become the Cyclopedia).  I played through the explosion of creativity in the '80s, witnessed the rise of story games (playing many of them, though not the White Wolf line of Storyteller games—I hated those), and continued through to the present day where I play intensely story-oriented games (FATE, Spark, Mythic, etc.) as well as some OSR or OSR-alike games (most notably Mazes & Minotaurs).  I am emphatically not a young-un telling grandpa what's what.  I'm one of the grandparents saying what actually was."

And she has some opinions. As always, a good read. In case you also have opinions there's a comment section.

https://gamerplus.org/blogs/post/782

RickStump joined the Related to Geeks Book club group. Megan and I did the podcast for a year and then went on to bigger and better things. (Hello Flunking The Written and twitch) I still read every day and would love to have a monthly book discussion. So, starting next week and continuing the first Monday of every month the opening topic at Inspired Unreality will be science fiction and fantasy literature with frequent forays into SF&F movies and games.

https://gamerplus.org/groups/28
https://anchor.fm/flunking-the-written
https://www.twitch.tv/megantopia
https://www.twitch.tv/hairylarryland

I posted a new photo gallery, The Masks Of The Zuni. If you are needing images of a witch doctor, shaman, or other all around weirdo these are public domain. There's even a bizarro Hairy Larry.

https://gamerplus.org/photo/useralbum/hairylarry/104

See you tonight on Inspired Unreality open game chat. Next week, books. Post some pics. Join in on the OSR discussion. At Gamer+.

Thanks,
Hairy Larry
https://gamerplus.org/user/hairylarry
hairylarry@curators.mixremix.cc
hairylarry@deltaboogie.com
ZDL

Our little hobby is filled with intriguing oddities.  One of the most persistent such oddities is our weird tendency to take what is already a fringe subculture and cut it up into further warring fringes.


In the '70s (and even a bit into the '80s) the hobby was divided into the camp of wargamers (themselves divided into board and miniatures camps, not to mention by era) and role-players.  This is where I entered the picture, and I came to it from a direction radically different than most RPGers of the time: I came at it from my high school drama flake crowd, not from the wargaming crowd.  I especially saw a lot of the disdain hurled at the role-playing fantasists crowd because I not only played them, I exclusively played them and really didn't like wargames.


As the great creative explosion of the '80s began, more and more weird divisions happened, usually in feuding camps based on genre (since most RPGs of the time still lived firmly in their wargaming roots).  This was also the era where "realism" vs. "playability" became an argument (despite no RPG ever written being even remotely realistic, and most were only barely playable: this is a hobby that demanded a degree of dedication to enter and be a part of!).


The '90s started to usher in the era of the "story-based" game (although the earliest of these were barely distinguishable in terms of rules focus from Dungeons & Dragons).  This is where the largest divide of role-playing games started and what is likely the largest single cultural shift of the hobby began, as typified by the (pretentiously idiotic) phrase "role-playing vs. roll-playing".


The earlier divides were arguments over taste.  Something in the loudest of the "story game" crowd stepped over a line from discussions of taste into very literal notions of "wrong fun".  In many ways it was the stalwart wargamer crowd's disdain of the role-playing crowd all over again, only it was the newcomers who held the most disdain.  The peak of this was likely the essays of people like John Wick or, worse, Ron Edwards who would start bizarrely hinting at (and sometimes openly stating) some kind of moral failing of those who preferred original-style dungeon bashes.  It reached the point that to this day I can't stomach the notion of actually buying a product published by some major names in gaming.  (And, naturally, because we can't have nice things, a lot of OSR advocates are just as disdainful of people who play differently as are people like the two I named above.  I'll just drop James Raggi's name here for that.)


And it was in the midst of this acrimony that sometime in the early '00s the OSR sprung up.  (OSR is an initialization I've seen expanded as Old School Revival, Recreation, Renaissance, and other such R words to the point I'm not sure which one is actually canonically correct, so I will just be using OSR.)  The OSR is a movement to return back to basics.  Back to E. Gary Gygax's original D&D.  To return to a time of simplicity.  It's a movement born of people wearing pink-tinted contact lenses because—hoo boy!—this is not a good description of the rules of the time!


There is a reason why the original edition of D&D was not the dominant one over the decades and that reason is not just, as has been claimed, a money-grab by TSR and others.


To establish my credentials, I have been playing RPGs of all kinds since 1977.  My first exposure to the genre was the 1977 "Blue Book" edition and I have backfilled experience with the original books, not to mention gone forward into both branches of D&D (Advanced and what would later become the Cyclopedia).  I played through the explosion of creativity in the '80s, witnessed the rise of story games (playing many of them, though not the White Wolf line of Storyteller games—I hated those), and continued through to the present day where I play intensely story-oriented games (FATE, Spark, Mythic, etc.) as well as some OSR or OSR-alike games (most notably Mazes & Minotaurs).  I am emphatically not a young-un telling grandpa what's what.  I'm one of the grandparents saying what actually was.


And what actually was was a mess.  Don't get me wrong.  I don't judge the OSR and, indeed, I like its ideals: simplicity chief among them.  I think modern games have gotten ridiculously and pointlessly complicated and as someone who works in marketing, I can even smell the marketing decisions that led to that.  I would love to have a game in the old style to play (and indeed do in the form of M&M).


I just don't want to play the original D&D.


So let's talk about why.


I have open on my screen the so-called "White Box" set of rules.  The three-volume set of Dungeons & Dragons published by Tactical Studies Rules in 1974 before they even had the TSR logo.  (Their logo looked like a bizarre stylized 'K' embedded in a similarly stylized 'G'.)  And already we're off to a rocky start.  On page 5 of the first book (Men & Magic) we have the recommended equipment which includes ... Chainmail miniature rules, latest edition.  Which, note, at the time of publication, wasn't even a TSR product.


Time to open another document.  (Picture me rolling my eyes here.)


The current edition of Chainmail at the time would have been 2nd.  The third was 1975, a year after D&D was published, while 2nd was 1972.  So this is the version we'll go with.


Back to D&D.  And here we get to the next problem with this edition of D&D (which I will refer to as OD&D from now on): the writing.  It's atrocious.  The information design is execrable.  Gary Gygax had a large vocabulary, but he had no clue how to use it to deliver information.  His writing style lies somewhere between the ponderousness of an academic frightened of clear communication because it would reveal how trivial the ideas under discussion actually are and a middle school essay writer earning his D+ marks throughout the term.  On page 6, for example, under the heading of "Characters", he introduces the 3 main classes of characters: Fighting-Men, Magic-Users, and Clerics.  Then, buried in the description of what these classes even are, he throws in the fact that fighting men can "include" elves, dwarves, and even halflings while magic-users can only be men and elves with clerics limited to men only.


(From the way it is worded it is easy to mistakenly think that men can only be magic-users and clerics, incidentally.)


In the section on Fighting-Men (referred to multiple times as "fighters" in the text because consistency in game terminology is for cowards?) there's a bizarre section irrelevant to the topic at hand consisting of base income for fighters of high enough a level.  In the section outlining Magic-Users there's a sudden table of income costs for making magic items.  In the section on Clerics there's more talk of income from high-level clerics and holdings.  NONE OF THIS IS RELEVANT.  The game is discussing stuff that comes at "end-game" (so to speak) for characters before they've even actually finished off what a character is and how to make one!  It's very clearly written stream-of-consciousness and it's a chore to decode.  THIS is why the Basic line was started and expanded into the Cyclopedia.  Gary Gygax's writing style is just not suited to actually explaining things!


And it continues on and on in this vein: opening up with the classes, introducing the classes, and mentioning races only in passing, suddenly, on the very next page, right after talking about Clerics, races are introduced at the same heading level in a jarring transition.  Each is defined solely by what it can and cannot do.  There's no explanation of what a "dwarf" or "elf" or "halfling" really is.  Maybe that's what you need Chainmail for?  Yep.  That's where the races are described.  (Though there's no "halflings".  Only hobbits.)  Further the races' advantages and abilities are explicitly specified in Chainmail.  You really do need Chainmail to play OD&D!


Alignment is handled in the same kind of slap-dash way: character types are defined by alignment, but alignment itself is not described (not even in Chainmail!).


This mess goes on and on.  There's rules for changing character classes that reference prime requisites, but prime requisites for classes haven't yet been defined!  (They do have the decency to forward-reference this, but this is utter crap information design.  We've known how to write better than this for centuries before D&D was written!)


Once you do decode this, the rules for making characters are, indeed, very simple.  It's just that the writing is so phenomenally bad that D&D rapidly became known as a game that you couldn't just buy and learn.  You had to have it taught to you.


And one of the purported advantages of the aulde skool rears its ugly head here: it is explicitly intended (according to the introduction) to be merely guidelines.  So what you were taught wouldn't transfer well to other groups…


Of course when you played, again you needed Chainmail according to the rules thus far.  We're on page 18 of the rules and half the rules mentioned explicitly call out to Chainmail for resolution.  Page 19 introduces the "alternative" combat system that replaces Chainmail's in which we see the beginning of the THAC0 system that was so beloved in later years.  And again it's incoherent dross.  The hit table only applies to fighters.  Magic-Users and Clerics use different progressions mentioned in an asterisked footnote.  This is also where the infamously bizarre categories of saving throws make their first appearance.  To this day I don't understand these categories, why they were made, what they were intended to represent.  I only know that it was really weird seeing rules in later editions say "save vs. paralyzation" for things that had nothing to do with paralyzation, just because those were the numbers the designer of the monster or trap or whatever liked best.


And of course the saving throw matrix manages to be incoherent there as well, interlacing levels and classes in bizarre ways making it awfully hard to figure out which is which when using it.


Anyway, I think I've made my point here.  The rules were awful.  They were incoherently written.  They relied on an outside book (then published by another publisher!) to actually use.  And on top of everything else, they covered so very little that, quite ironically, to use them meant the referee (DM being a later term!) had to make things up on the fly all the time.  Just like the "GM fiat" games that many OSR advocates deride now.


They're god-awful rules!


And note, I'm not saying here that the rules should cover every possible contingency.  In that direction lies madness (also known as Chivalry & Sorcery)!  But what the rules should provide (and emphatically don't!) is a coherent framework for adjudication.


Now D&D has an excuse.  It was the first game of a kind nobody had ever seen before.  Dave Arneson and Gary Gygax deserve the accolades they get for having made it and popularized it.  I will never cast shade on the giants who made the very hobby I love so well!  But I absolutely will cast shade on the people who think that OD&D was the best of all possible times to the point of wanting to return to it.


Not casting shade in the "wrongfun" sense either, but rather in the "are you really sure?" sense.  Because yes, there is a lot of the OSR vibe I love.  I just don't like the game at the core of it and I think an attempt to return to that in specific, even if rewritten to be more coherent, is doomed to failure.  I think there is room for the OSR concept: simple, fun-focused, hack-and-slash or exploration-oriented, pick-up-and-play games that also have room for depth and soul but that don't have a need for the millions of pages of rules for every contingency.  For the concepts behind D&D, but concepts executed with now nearly 40 years of design experience to get it right.

ZDL Jun 26 · Comments: 21 · Tags: osr, dungeons & dragons, critique, deep dive, flamebait
hairylarry
Join us tonight on Inspired Unreality open game chat. The opening topic is Mixed Parties, that is parties where the PCs are at different levels. This was baked into OSR games, back when sometimes the monsters killed the PCs and when different classes took more or less XP to level up. Also you can bring your own topic. Open game chat. All gaming is on topic.

Inspired Unreality is held in the gamerplus chatrooms at Tenkar's Tavern on Discord. If you've never been we have an invitation for you here.

https://gamerplus.org/index

There is an ongoing discussion thread on this topic at Gamer+. This will be the starting point for Inspired Unreality tonight.

Draklorx wrote "I think this is a cool aspect of old school games that isn't common anymore. I love the grittiness of it, and the mixed levels never bothered me when I played. ... That said, for a dungeon master it's much easier to do milestone leveling and have all the players be the same level."

ZDL wrote, "There are several aspects of old school games I like, most notably the increased diversity that randomness tended to cause.

The wildly divergent capabilities of characters, however, was not one of them. In the presence of most GMs, having the weakest character meant a) dying, or b) not having anything to do. Neither of these is really conducive to enjoyment."

hairylarry wrote "And then there's the whole non combat side. The role playing, puzzle solving, exploration part where characters of all levels are more equal and the results depend more on the player than on PC stats."

hairylarry wrote "There is a built in premise in OSR games. PCs need XP to level up. You get XP by killing monsters. So, let's go kill some monsters. At a lot of tables that is the game. To me, it's a side show and as I get older I run more games that are all exploration and role play without any combat at all."

CarlHeyl wrote, "I'd like to add that in the oldest of old school most of your XP came from earning treasure not killing monsters. Which means two things 1. You don't have to fight that big bad monster if there was a way around it to get the treasure behind it. and 2. Your lower level character would level very rapidly because of the amount of gold the higher level party was able to procure."

If this interests you there's more here.

https://gamerplus.org/newsfeed/4131

Worldbuilding Magazine is proud to present our June 2021 issue: Cosmology. We’ve taken a step back from our usual in-depth look at the details of worldbuilding and this time we’re talking about the cosmos.

https://gamerplus.org/newsfeed/4133

I hope to see you tonight on Inspired Unreality to hear you opinions about mixed parties. Or you can log on to Gamer+ and share your thoughts.

Thanks,
Hairy Larry
https://gamerplus.org/user/hairylarry
hairylarry@curators.mixremix.cc
hairylarry@deltaboogie.com


hairylarry
|xvx^/x\
\os Hx/s
\os \u/s
^x^+

Tonight! On Inspired Unreality Ari and the Milyagon witch continue researching the potion book that Ari's cat Tude found near the witch's garden. So far they have tested a brew that enables far sighted telescopic vision. When stirred with the silver wand King Groads sent to the witch they also enabled microscopic vision. A kind of a scrying tea with a twist. They have decrypted another recipe that may be a love potion.

Join us on Inspired Unreality tonight to test a love potion or just to chat about gaming. Everyone is welcome. All gaming is on topic.

Inspired Unreality is held in the gamerplus chatrooms every Monday night at 9:00 at Tenkar's Tavern on Discord. If you haven't been we have an invite for you here.

https://gamerplus.org/index

Every gamer knows about thieve's cant, words and symbols only thieves know. Inspired by Ari's book discovered on Inspired Unreality I am working on Witch's Chicken Scratch, a kind of shorthand that witch's in the past used to record the exact ingredients in their teas and potions. Since they knew their ingredients and how they blended them together all they needed was a short list to remind them exactly what they used.

Silent letters ignored, past witch's scrawled geometric figures in neat rows as a way of remembering their recipes while at the same time concealing them from prying eyes. Witches do love their secrets.

Ari and the Milyagon witch have deciphered two recipes so far. One is at the top of the page. Here are the witch's notes that she made while reseaching the book.

m = ^
n = ^
v = v
t = +
l = |
r = \
d = /
o = o
u = u
w = w
other vowels = x

https://gamerplus.org/newsfeed/4126

See if you can decipher the recipe at the top of this newsletter.

Maybe it's a mood elevator.
Or maybe it's a love potion.

Join us tonight and maybe we'll find out.

After drinking this Tea of Prescience I can see another Milyagon minizine in the future, "Tea Recipes In Witch's Chicken Scratch".

Thanks,
Hairy Larry
https://gamerplus.org/user/hairylarry
hairylarry@curators.mixremix.cc
hairylarry@deltaboogie.com
hairylarry
I've been working on the chicken scratch for Ari's book of teas and potions.

m = ^
n = ^
v = v
t = +
l = |
r = \

d = /

o = o

u = u

w = w

other vowels = x

So

mint = ^x^+
lemon = |x^o^
lavender = |xvx^/x\

So it's just a substitution code but all the marks are very easy to write and, coincidentally, easy to type.
hairylarry Jun 10 · Comments: 1 · Tags: potions, teas, rpg, osr, milyagon, d&d
hairylarry
Join us tonight on Inspired Unreality open game chat. Will Ari and Caper explore new tea blends? Will the witch learn more about the silver wand King Groads gave her? Or will we just chat about games and gaming? Nobody knows??? Because we're winging it!

Inspired Unreality is held at 9:00 PM Central every Monday night in the gamerplus chatrooms at Tenkar's Tavern on Discord. If you haven't been to Tenkar's Tavern we have an invite for you here.

https://gamerplus.org/index

I posted another article about Setting Up A Twitch Studio where I discuss workflow. In any job workflow is important. In video production a streamlined workflow is essential. I know workflow sounds boring and wonky but it's not. This may be the most important article in the series.

https://gamerplus.org/blogs/post/775

Gamer+ Gamers Do Stuff

Peter_R posted Troika Cards! Woo Hoo! to his Solo Roleplaying & Game Mastery blog.

https://www.ppmgames.co.uk/2021/02/09/troika-cards-woo-hoo

https://gamerplus.org/user/Peter_R

TheEvilDM posted another episode to his actual play podcast, The World of Arkonis Episode 51 – Evil Lair 3, is this the one?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qGZrFFLGH4M

https://gamerplus.org/user/TheEvilDM

If you're doing stuff let me know. I want to add your stuff to Gamer+ News.

Thanks,
Hairy Larry
https://gamerplus.org/user/hairylarry

hairylarry@curators.mixremix.cc

hairylarry@deltaboogie.com
 
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